Video & Audio Gallery


 

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  Bill McKibben.
Bill McKibben is author of several books including Deep Economy and Eaarth. Bill McKibben presented at the Economics of Happiness Conference via Skype. This is a recording of his talk.

 

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  Manish Jain: Modern Schooling and the Corporate Agenda
Governments, charities, NGOs, and most of public see modern education as the best way for communities to 'develop' and pull themselves out of poverty.  But according to Manish, modern schooling is actually advancing corporate interests at the expense of people and nature.

Manish Jain is a leading critic of the "hidden curriculum" of modern compulsory education, and the founder of Shikshantar, The Peoples' Institute for Rethinking Education and Development, based in Udaipur, India.

 

   Sulak Sivaraksa: The Structural Violence of the Global Economy
Non-violence is at the core of many spiritual traditions.  But what does it mean to say "I will not kill" when we allow our governments to kill; what does it mean to say "I will not steal" when we allow corporations to steal? Sulak encourages us to move beyond the personal to the political, without blaming the oppressor, focusing instead on changing the oppressive system that surrounds us.

 

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  Richard Heinberg: The End of the Line for Economic Growth.
The global economy is reaching a dead end: resource depletion, climate change, and financial collapse are some of the signposts telling us that we need to change direction, and quickly.  Richard describes how these crises (and others) are interlinked--the products of deeply dysfunctional global economic order.

Richard Heinberg is a fellow with the Post Carbon Institute, and the author of numerous books including "Peak Everything" and "The End of Growth". For more information about Richard's work, go to richardheinberg.com.

 
  Rebecca Tarbotton: Globalization as Driver of Environmental Decline.
From rainforest destruction to nuclear waste, from species extinction to fracking and tar sands extraction, these are consequences of a runaway global economy with a voracious appetite for natural resources.  Rebecca explores the ways in which globalization itself is among the main drivers of environmental decline.

 

 

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  Ross Jackson: Occupy World Street.
The World Order is clearly broken, clearly dysfunctional. It's now time that we stop tinkering at the edges and move towards a structurally different system.  Ross outlines a breakaway strategy--a visionary and practical program for international collaboration to redesign the global economy.

 

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  Helena Norberg-Hodge: An Overview of Localization.
It is often assumed that localization means an end to all international trade, or total self-sufficiency on a village-scale. Helena provides an overview, exposing the myths and misconceptions that stand in our way. She explores the multiple benefits of localizing, with an emphasis on psychological and spiritual dimensions.

 

    Annie Leonard: moving from consumer to citizen.
Many forces today encourage us to relate to others--and even to think of ourselves--as consumers. Among the results are a depleted environment, social isolation and inequality, mountains of trash, and widespread unahppiness. Annie explains why reclaiming our Citizen Selves is the key to making our democracy work for real people, to creating a more healthy and fair economy, and to having way more fun.

Annie Leonard is author and host of The Story of Stuff and director of The Story of Stuff Project. She has also worked with GAIA (Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives), Health Care Without Harm, Essential Action and Greenpeace International.

 

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  Stacy Mitchell: Local revival: building a decentralized economy.
Local farms, independent retailers, and community banks are all experiencing newfound public support and growing in number. While these trends are encouraging, local businesses still account for only a small share of the economy. Stacy presents a compelling case for moving local enterprises from the economy's margins to its mainstream.

 
 

 

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  Michael Shuman: Local Dollars, Local Sense.
The Localization of business and banking could have immense benefit, not only by limiting damage caused by the global "casino" economy, but in creating more secure employment and real prosperity. Michael describes some of those benefits, and how citizen investors can support local enterprize.

 

 

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  Koyu Furusawa: Local food initiatives in Japan.
The local food movement in Japan is gaining ground and branching out. Koyu lays out the benefits of more localized food economies, and presents some inspiring examples of on-the-ground initiatives in Japan, including the Slow Food movement, permanent agriculture, and community supported agriculture.

 

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  Azby Brown: Lessons from Preindustrial Japan.
During the Edo period, Japan developed technological and social structures that increased local autonomy, self-sufficiency, and sustainability. Azby suggests that "Edo-logy" can provide a coherent model for rethinking current social, economic, and environmental problems, and can point to solutions that can be widely applied today.

 




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  Maria Gastelumendi: Indie Business Perspectives on Occupy Oakland and Beyond.
The Occupy movement has played an important role in bringing economic justice into the public eye.  Despite the criticism leveled against it, it has highlighted some of the greatest social impacts of the global corporate economy. The movement has also forged links between disparate social and economic groups, as well as local business. Maria discusses the partnerships that have been built between Occupy activists and local business in Oakland, California. She also addresses the non-violent foundations of the Occupy movement as well as the rebuilding of our communities.

 

 

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  Ancient Futures: North-South Dialogue with Helena Norberg-Hodge and Jon Symes of Pachamama Alliance (Workshop)
Myths about progress paint the South (or Third World) as poor and underdeveloped, and the West as successful and prosperous. Yet the psychological, social, and environmental costs of globalized development are high in both North and South. How can we bridge the information gap between the industrialized and developing worlds to expose the effects of globalization? What can we learn from each other about human-scale governance, about our relationship to the natural world, about the way we raise our children?

 

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  Judy Wicks: An Entrepreneur's Persepctive on Building the New Economy.
To build an economy that is green, fair, and fun, entrepreneurs must move from the old paradigm of measuing sucess by continual material growth and learn to grow in new ways. Judy talks about her own awakening to the needs of a caring economy, about the important of maximizing relationships rather than profits, and about businesses that are cooperating to build local living economies.

 
  Carol Black: Reclaiming Our Children, Reclaiming the World. Carol Black is the director of the award-winning film, Schooling the World, which raises troubling questions about the way western-style schooling homogenizes cultures worldwide. This talk was given at ISEC's Economics of Happiness Conference in Berkeley, California in March of 2012. For information about Carol's film, go to www.schoolingtheworld.org. Running time: 11:41

 

  Gustavo Esteva: Challenging the Institutional Production of Truth.
Today's power structures have been maintained through a virtual monopoly on the production of "truth" through such institutions as the media, academia, and a regime of scientific and economic "experts".  Gustavo describes the revival of local, autonomous systems of knowledge around the world.

Gustavo Esteva is the co-founder of several Mexican, Latin American, and International NGO's, and is the recipient of Mexico's National Prize for Political Economy. He is active in Zapatismo, a movement for protecting the rights of indigenous peoples.

 

 

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  Charles Eisenstein Workshop: From Gift Economics to Gift Cosmology.
Charles Eisenstein is a leading writer, teacher, and thinker focusing on themes of civilization, money, consciousness, and cultural evolution. 
Gift relationships wove together pre-modern societies and informed a world-view of connection, cooperation, and interbeing. This workshop asks, how can we rebuild out shattered communities today? How can we relearn to see eachother, and the world, through the eyes of the gift?

 
   Yoji Kamata: The Localization Movement in Japan.
Yoji Kamata is the founder and chairperson of the Ancient Futures Association Japan.  He is the representative of the 1st and 2nd Ecovillage Design Education in Japan, and practical peace education project in Nepal. He is also the advisor to the Himalayan Amchi (Doctor of Traditional Tibetan Medicine) in Nepal.

 
  Vandana Shiva.
An interview on various topics--from industrial agriculture to localization to hope. This footage was shown at the Economics of Happiness Conference 2012. The interview was originally conducted for "The Economics of Happiness" film. Running time: 10:26

 
  Yet We Sow: Voices of Organic Farmers After Fukushima.
This clip was presented by conference delegates from Japan who have been following the issues very closely.  They expressed deep concern for the plight of farmers, and strongly urged one and all to oppose nuclear energy. 

 
  Bill McKibben.
Author and activist Bill McKibben describes how localization can address climate change and other social/environmental problems. This interview was originally taken for "The Economics of Happiness" film. Running time: 3:16